TRADITIONS FROM DIFFERENT COUNTRIES THAT SURPRISE THE WORLD

Picture1 - TRADITIONS FROM DIFFERENT COUNTRIES THAT SURPRISE THE WORLD

Picture1 - TRADITIONS FROM DIFFERENT COUNTRIES THAT SURPRISE THE WORLD

Every country is different, not everything in every country is similar or familiar to everyone. We cannot even expect the rest of the world to be like us, or else it will all become so monotonous. When we hear stories that are different that might leave us with a cultural shock but it is fine that’s how things are done them, so here are various traditions along with the globe which definitely amazes you.

No toilet papers in many Asian countries:

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Many travelers will be surprised to find that in India toilet paper is not commonly found in bathrooms. In fact, water from a small bucket found next to the toilet is used instead to wash up afterward. Using toilet paper is generally a bad idea, as it might clog the pipes and creates extra waste.

Newly weds are not allowed to go to the bathroom in tidong community:

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In the Indonesian Tidong community there is a wedding ritual where the groom and bride can not urinate or defecate for 3 days and 3 nights. It is said that if they do not follow this tradition it would bring them bad luck to the couple: broken marriage, infidelity, or death of their children at a young age. During this very challenging tradition, the couple is overseen by several people to ensure they go through with it. Also during this, the couple is not allowed to leave the house and are fed small amounts of food and water to limit the urge to use the bathroom.

Try and gift a yellow rose in mexico:

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Roses are a great gift to show emotion just about anywhere in the world. However, when choosing a color, some countries relate special meanings to certain roses. In Mexico, it’s better to stick to a traditional red rose rather than a yellow rose, which means death in Mexican culture.

Polterbend this shocking German wedding custom:

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The word itself comes from the verb Polten – to make a lot of noise and Abend – evening. That noise comes in the form of smashing porcelain and of course the raucous partying that accompanies the evening. The saying goes ‘Scherben bringen Glück’ – shards bring luck, which is actually a reference back to a time when clay pots were known as ‘shards’ and it was regarded as lucky to have one which was complete and undamaged. Nowadays the shards come in the form of broken porcelain, pottery and sanitary ware bought by the guests and smashed onsite. The party traditionally took place at the home of the bride but nowadays the location is a little more flexible, and usually takes place in the happy couples current hometown. The couple is responsible for cleaning up the shards, to instill in them the need for teamwork in their future married life.

If you are single in Denmark by 25 people throw spices at you:

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When you are 25 and you are still unmarried, you will be smashed with spices by people on the street. The tradition is followed since hundreds of years when the salesman of spices used to travel and never had time to settle down. This is even carried in public, and if you are 30 and still unmarried the spices change from cinnamon to pepper.

The Hungarians do not clink their glasses to toast:

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In Hungary people don’t clink beer glasses. Legend has it, that when Hungary’s 1848 revolution against the Habsburgs was defeated, the Austrians celebrated in Vienna by toasting and clinking their beer glasses. Hungarians vowed not to cheers with beer for 150 years. While that time frame is over – Hungarians still don’t ‘cheers’ with beer. Nevertheless, with any other alcoholic beverage like wine or pálinka it’s considered rude not to look the other person in the eye when saying cheers (‘egészségedre’). People will literally have their eyes wide open and protruding as they clink glasses to make sure you know that they’re looking at you and that they know that you’re looking at them.

Greet others by spitting, Maasai:

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While spitting is considered rude in many cultures, in the Kenyan Maasai tribe it is the customary way of greeting and showing respect. Members of the tribe will spit into their hands before shaking them, and they also do this to newborn babies or even a bride to bless them and bring them good luck.

Arrive late, Venezuela:

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Whether you’re attending an event, a meeting, or a party in Venezuela, it’s common for people to arrive later than originally planned. Venezuelans enjoy a relaxed pace when it comes to business, and for big social events arriving late simply means making a big entrance.

Wearing funny hats when single, France:

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In France, the 25th of November celebrates Sainte Catherine, the young patron saint of unmarried women. On this day, women who have reached 25 years of age wear green and yellow hats which signify wisdom and faith. While some “Catherinettes” celebrate the day in hopes of being married soon, others proudly embrace their single life.

image source: Google